Sorghum Syrup

Sorghum syrup and hot biscuits are a traditional breakfast in the Southern United States. Sorghum syrup is also used on pancakes, cornmeal mush, grits and other hot cereals. It can be used as a cooking ingredient with a similar sweetening effect as molasses, despite the fact that blackstrap molasses still has a higher nutritional value than sorghum syrup in most regards.

Sweet sorghum syrup is sometimes called “molasses” or “sorghum molasses” in some regions of the U.S., but the term molasses more properly refers to a different sweet syrup, made as a byproduct of sugarcane or sugar beet sugar extraction.

In the U.S. since the 1950s, sorghum has been raised primarily for forage and silage, with sorghum cultivation for cattle feed concentrated in the Great Plains (Texas, Kansas, and Nebraska are the leading producers) where insufficient rainfall and high temperature make corn production unprofitable.

Tip: To measure honey and syrups easily, use a metal spoon that has been dipped in hot water. Honey and syrups will not stick to a heated spoon.

Source: Wikipedia
Recipes using : Sorghum Syrup


Golden Barrel Sorghum Syrup Wide Mouth Jar – 16 oz

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